Overhand vs. Underhand – Understanding Pull Ups And Its Variations

Anyone who is slightly familiar with lifting, is also aware of pull-ups and their profound impacts on the body. Pull-ups are regarded as the most difficult body-weight exercise that is challenging regardless of the strength level you train on. These lifting manoeuvres activate large muscle groups in the upper back. Keep up with the pulling, and you have reached halfway to acquiring a broad torso and a jaw-dropping physique. Since the exercise comes with many variations, it is difficult to choose the best for your needs. This feature highlights the most popular variations; the pull-up and the chin-up, noting down the main difference and why should you adopt any of these two.

Overhand vs. Underhand

An overhand grip a little wider than shoulders which is done using both hands is the most difficult variation of pull-ups. The wide grip puts the lats into main focus while ignoring the biceps. The underhand, on the contrary, is considered an ideal way to build on the biceps along with upper back. The underhand movement calls for a supinated grip, involving more bicep muscles rather than just the back. While lifting its weight over the bar, the body utilizes some other moves, making it is easier to perform than its counterpart. Though underhand pull-ups do target upper back, it is quite difficult to isolate those muscles.

Keeping the hand movement aside, both overhand and underhand seem to be tiring for most guys since they are not used to such bodyweight movements. Most of the guys spent a lot of their time in front of the computer in a hunched forward position, making it difficult to perform a chinup. A rounded back moved forward makes it difficult for the shoulders to adjust accordingly during a chin up, making it hard for them to pull back and down. This difficulty in executing proper movement doesn’t fully activate the lats, putting pressure on the biceps. Since the hands have to be fully rotated externally to grab the bar, athletes find it difficult to perform the move. To overcome this issue, and to perfect both variations it is best to engage into soft tissue exercises for the chest, pre-workout. While performing the pull-ups focus on moving shoulders down and back so that your lats are directly targeted.

Which One Should You Choose?

There is no straightforward answer to this. If you are aiming for a good body along with increased strength, then you should perform both of these workouts. In order to build a back made of concrete and to increase your relative body strength, consider incorporating both overhand and underhand into your workout multiple times in a week. While they help you build your strength, they are also a great way to warm-up your body before a lifting session. Focus on keeping your form intact and avoid creating momentum to aid you in lifting. This will give you remarkable strength, which will soon become apparent.

Following workout is a composite of both underhand and overhand pull-ups. Incorporating this into your fitness regime will help you gain a torso that you boast around along with phenomenal strength.

Directions

You should perform the underhand and overhand pull-ups as a warm-up or as a secondary exercise following lower body lifts such as deadlifts or squats. Take at least two days off after performing the workout to let your upper body recover.

First Week

Day 1: Overhand

Sets/Reps: 5/5

Weighted: If necessary

Day 2: Underhand

Sets/Reps: 3/10

Day 3: Overhand Pyramid

Sets/Reps: Start with 2 reps then take rest for about 1 minute. Then perform 4 reps, followed by 6, 8 and 10 reps. Reverse all the way back to 2 reps. Make sure that you maintain a good form as long as you can.

Second Week

Day 1: Overhand

Sets/Reps: 3/5

Weighted: If necessary

Day 2: Underhand

Sets/Reps: 3/10

Day 3: Overhand Pyramid

Sets/Reps: Start with 2 reps then take rest for about 1 minute. Then perform 4 reps, followed by 6, 8, 10 and more reps. Reverse all the way back to 2 reps. Make sure that you maintain a good form as long as you can.

Third Week

Day 1: Overhead

Sets/Reps: 4/5

Weighted: If necessary

Day 2: Underhand

Sets/Reps: 4/10

Day 3: Overhand

Sets/Reps: Start with 2 reps then take rest for about 1 minute. Then perform 4 reps, followed by 6, 8, 10 and more, taking it further than previous week. Reverse all the way back to 2 reps. Make sure that you maintain a good form as long as you can.

Fourth Week

Day 1: Overhand

Sets/Reps: 4/5

Day 2: Underhand

Sets/Reps: 4/10

Day 3: Overhand Pyramid

Sets/Reps: Start with 2 reps then take rest for about 1 minute. Then perform 4 reps, followed by 6, 8, 10 and more, taking it further than previous week. Reverse all the way back to 2 reps. Make sure that you maintain a good form as long as you can.